What is the Difference Between Active and Passive Safety Features?

2019 Chevrolet Safety Features Rear Cross Traffic Alert
Today’s vehicles are packed with enhanced technology to keep you safe, offering extra layers of protection during your daily Clarkston commute. When comparing the differences between active vs. passive safety features, the biggest difference is when these unique systems come into play. In general, active safety features work to prevent accidents, while passive safety features activate during a collision to protect the driver and passengers.

Active Safety Features

Examples of active safety features include any systems that continuously work to keep your car stable and in control on the road. These features are active because they are always on, and alert you to potential danger without your having to activate them. The Chevrolet lineup includes a wide array of innovative active safety technology that works together to provide you with an extra set of eyes as you drive. You can find these systems actively working in the:

  • Brakes – with Front Pedestrian Braking and Forward Automatic Braking, your Chevrolet will detect possible incoming collisions, and automatically apply the brakes before impact
  • Cameras – see everything around you thanks to your high-definition Surround Vision camera and rear vision and mirror cameras
  • Alerts – never fall victim to a blind spot again with assists from Rear Cross Traffic Alerts, Lane Departure Warnings, Side Blind Zone Alert, and many more

Passive Safety Features

Should the unexpected happen, passive safety features come to the rescue by protecting you and your loved ones during an accident. These features are passive because they are only activated once a collision occurs. The best example of a passive safety feature is your airbag system, which triggers upon impact. Similarly, your seatbelts and the overall construction of your car play a role in keeping all passengers safe during a crash, minimizing the overall impact.

Stay Safe in a New Chevrolet

From the Malibu to the Traverse, the entire Chevrolet lineup was designed to keep everyone on the road safe and protected. If you’re shopping for a safe, reliable vehicle, visit Bowman Chevrolet today to experience all the active and passive safety features that will give you extra peace of mind when you’re behind the wheel. Contact us to get started!

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How to Protect Your Car from Road Salt

road salt ice melter
Winter driving can take a toll as you navigate snow, ice, and dangerous storms for months on end. Learning how to protect your car from road salt will help extend the life and performance of your vehicle, and can help you avoid costly repairs in the future. Protect your car from extreme cold, and receive total peace of mind while driving this winter.

What does road salt do to cars?

Road salt is helpful for creating safe driving conditions during winters in Waterford, but it is not a friend to your car. If left to its own devices, salt can lead to rust and corrosion on multiple areas of your vehicle, particularly underneath and near the wheels. The longer salt sits on your car, the more damage it can cause, leading to expensive repairs to the hydraulic brake system, subframe, and more. Not only will it affect the performance of your car, but exterior rust is also an eyesoar, bringing down the value and your overall satisfaction with your ride.

How do I prevent car rust during winter?

To shield your car against harmful winter corrosion, follow these helpful tips:

  • Wash your car as frequently as possible to remove salt from the exterior. If available, choose the extra undercarriage wash options to blast away any salt hiding below. Once your car is clean, be sure to open all the doors to let out any accumulated water that could freeze if left alone.
  • Be sure to keep your wheels and tires free from chunks of ice, leaves, and any other materials. Salt can collect in these tight spaces, so it’s important to visually inspect them on a regular basis. This applies to your grill as well.
  • Check to ensure all floor and frame drainage holes are not blocked and can safely allow any and all moisture to get through.

Protect Your Investment with Bowman Chevrolet

Our service team wants to make sure all our Oakland County clients drive with confidence during winter, and we’re here to help with all the winter driving tips you need. Check out our current service specials to keep your vehicle running at its best for less!

Strange Car Noises

Mechanics repairing strange noise in car
If you’re used to the peace and quiet of your morning commute, then strange car noises are an alarming development. And while car grinding and squealing noises might send you into a panic, it’s important to take a moment to listen closely. These strange car noises can be a huge clue while diagnosing problems under the hood. From frayed belts to worn brakes to tire troubles, we’ve assembled a brief guide to point you in the right direction.

Squeaks and Squeals

Notice a high-pitched sound coming from the vehicle? These squeaks and squeals can indicate several problems, so pay attention to when you notice the noise.

  • Belts: If you hear a squeal when you shut down the engine, then your belt may be damaged. You might need a replacement or just a simple readjustment.
  • Brakes: Squealing brakes indicate overly worn brake pads. Be sure to stick to your scheduled maintenance to ensure that your brakes stay in top condition.
  • Bearings: If you hear a whining sound during corners, your wheel bearings may need some work. A fresh set can bring the life back into your vehicle.

Car Grinding and Rumbles

A high-pitched squeal is hard to miss, but sometimes strange car noises are a bit more subtle. See if any of these noises sound familiar!

  • Exhaust and Muffler: Notice a rumble toward the back of the car? This is often an issue with your exhaust system, but it could be the catalytic converter. Best to schedule an appointment to get your car on a hoist immediately!
  • Suspension System: If your car lets out a clunk when you hit a speed bump, it’s time to get that suspension system in line. It might be an issue with the shock absorbers.
  • Tires and Wheels: A rhythmic ticking might mean your tires and wheels need some work. The issue could be anything from low air pressure to an unbalanced set.

Schedule Your Service Today!

If you’re fed up with strange car noises, then schedule your service with Bowman Chevy today. We’re located in Clarkston, near Detroit and Waterford, and we’d be happy to bring your car back to peak performance. Still have questions? Contact us online at any time!

Warning Signs Your Car May Need Chevy Certified Service

Has it been awhile since your last vehicle service appointment? If you notice any of the warning signs that it is time for maintenance, the Chevrolet Certified Service Department at Bowman Chevy would be glad to assist you. What are the warning signs you should look out for?

Video Transcription:

“In the event that something goes wrong, there are usually warning signs that led up to it. By following the manufacturer’s recommended maintenance schedule and heeding the warning signs that your vehicle may need service, you can have added peace of mind driving. Some of the warning signs that your vehicle may need service include fluid leaking, lower gas mileage, not starting right away, grinding or squeaking brakes, strange noises, or your vehicle starts drifting to one side or the other. Dashboard warning lights, like the check engine light, oil pressure warning light, coolant temp warning light, or the tire pressure monitor alert, also help warn about potential problems. All these signs mean it’s time for maintenance, and Chevrolet Certified Service can help you with the necessary repairs. Call or click to schedule your appointment today.”

Schedule an Appointment at Bowman Chevy

It is quick and convenient to schedule your next service appointment. Simply fill out our online form, or give us a call at (877) 345-9943.

What Child Safety Seat Should I Use?

Mother securing her baby in the car seat in her car

The kids are all packed and ready to go, but is the car properly prepared for a family-friendly journey? Many new parents wonder, “What child safety seat should I use?” to keep the little ones protected on the go. The answer depends on the age of your child. From rear-facing seats for toddler to booster seats for children, we’ve created a guide to help you navigate the different options for every age group. Read on for more information and if you need any extra help, feel free to contact Bowman Chevy for all the details!

General Tips

Most car seats are made for a specific age group, as well as a height and weight range. Pay close attention to the height and weight maximums, since children grow rapidly in the first few years. A seat that fit your preschooler may be far too small for your kindergartener. Regardless of price and marketing, the best seat is simply the one that fits your child and your vehicle properly. We recommend getting to know your vehicle’s LATCH system, which is a built-in universal attachment system to secure car seats of any brand.

Car Seats by Age Group

Now that you know the basics, let’s go into the specifics! Here is a quick run-down of the appropriate car seat for each age group. However, be sure to do a little research before you commit to a model – especially if your child is on the cusp.

  • Infants and toddlers should use a rear-facing seat to stay safe on the road. Parents can choose an infant-only seat until they reach around 20 pounds, or they can opt for a convertible seat when the baby is a little older.
  • Toddlers and preschoolers can switch to a forward-facing seat once they outgrow the weight or height maximums of the rear-facing seat. These seats come with a harness to keep your little one secure.
  • Young children between 3 and 8 years old can graduate to a booster seat, which gives them extra height to reach the car’s safety belt. Consider opting for a high-back booster if your car has a lower backseat, or go for a backless booster if your car has a headrest.
  • Older children who have grown to 4 foot 9 inches can use the car’s seat belt normally. Children under 13 should stay in the back, while teens can ride up front with parents.